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So, you’re running a Facebook ad or two or three, and you aren’t seeing any results. Maybe you think you’re getting results from the high numbers under people reached or post engagements that Facebook is showing you, but you aren’t getting any leads or sales. 

If your Facebook ad gets approved in a peak time, it can inflate these numbers even more. Don’t be duped. We’ll show you what numbers actually matter with Facebook advertising so you can see your real results and what’s working and what’s not. 

(Sidenote: If Facebook ad metrics are getting you down or you don’t have time to go in and manage every single ad your running for your agency, check out our easy-to-read, easy-to-use Facebook ads software: The Campaign Maker. 30 Day Free Trial Available). 

Truly understanding Facebook ad metrics can revolutionize the way you advertise on Facebook and can save (and make) you serious money. For example, Facebook readily displays the number that will make you think your ad is working. 

If you don’t know where to look or what numbers to analyze and you see the high numbers as you click on Facebook Ad Center, you’ll happily keep paying for ads, waiting for the day you actually make a sale. 

For more details on the Facebook ads metrics that are vital to your success: Download our FREE 67 page ebook here! 

 

Metrics that Don’t Really Matter 

Pro Tip: When you go to the Facebook Ads Manager, click on the Columns section, It will automatically be set on Performance (as seen below). This is, once again, Facebook’s version of performance, which is a tad over-inflated. 

Next, scroll down to Customize Columns. Then, feel free to remove the following categories so you can focus on the metrics that matter. 

*Note the Customize Columns section is the next to the last option, which is conveniently where someone would be the most likely to overlook! Oh, and it’s under a thin bar like it’s something you don’t really need. Oh, Facebook… 

  • Relevance Score. Relevance scoring on Facebook is a weird process. It can be explained, of course, but when we see–time and time again–lower-relevancy ads outperforming high-relevancy ads, the relevancy of Facebook’s relevance score goes way down in our book. 
  • Reach. Talk about a number that should matter but doesn’t! Even with a targeted audience, the reach of your Facebook ad, even if it’s in the hundreds or thousands, is usually abysmal relative to the number of Facebook users in your audience. Move your 

eyes two boxes to the right and see the Link Clicks. See a drastically smaller number? Yeah. 

  • Post Engagements. This number is yet another number that should matter but often doesn’t. It includes actions such comments, shares and offer claims, which all actually DO matter. but then, to inflate the number and to excite you, Facebook also throws in the photo views or 3-second video views. Doesn’t that sound an awful lot like the reach? 

Everyone that the ad has reached is probably going to stop at your Facebook ad for the general 3-second rule to look at it it before moving on. Once again, a fairly useless number. 

Scroll on down to the Reactions, Comments and Shares section to see a number that does mean something. People should be reacting to your Facebook ads. If they aren’t, you may need to consider running a different ad that will inspire emotion or action of some sort. 

  • Clicks. If you have a headline or callout on the first line of your ad followed by the “See More” button, ta-da! You get a click because people are curious. Congrats! The real question is: did that click lead to sale? 

 

IF YOUR CAMPAIGN NEEDS TO MAKE SALES PAY ATTENTION TO THESE METRICS: 

  1. Cost Per 1,000 Impressions or CPM: What it cost you on average to 

show your Facebook ad to 1,000 people. 

Pro Tip: A high CPM means you should target a different audience. 

 

  1. Click-through Rate or CTR Links: The number of people who viewed your 

ad, clicked and went directly to your landing or sales page. Now we’re talking! 

Pro Tip: If the Click-through Rate is low, consider making a more creative, compelling ad. 

 

  1. Cost Per Click or CPC: Here is where the clicks would matter! When your 

Facebook ad audience clicks over to your sales page or website. Not just random clicks to “See More.” This number gives the clicks a purpose –clicking on your link

 

  1. Cost Per Sale. How much did it cost to make the average sale? Divide your 

number of sales made during the campaign by your total amount spent. 

 

  1. Amount Spent. Keep a watchful eye on how much you’ve spent on your ad so 

far. 

 

Now that you know what Facebook ad metrics are actually useful, how did you do? If you’re like most, you and your ads could use some help. 

Let us just say, it’s not your fault. Facebook and the Facebook Ads Manager wasn’t exactly designed for user-friendliness, or budget-friendliness, especially not for Facebook ad agencies or for those with multiple Facebook ad campaigns. 

That’s why we created The Campaign Maker, which uses our proven 4 step method to create profitable campaigns consistently. 

 

HERE IS OUR SECRET FORMULA FOR FACEBOOK ADS SUCCESS: Download the ebook for a detailed guide!!! 

We call it the A.C.O.R method, and it can be our little secret if you choose to use it. Our lips are sealed! 

A is for Analyze 

Whether your campaign was thriving or flunking, you need to know the Facebook ad metrics that got you there! 

C is for Create 

You know what works and what doesn’t. Now, it’s time to create a brand new, successful campaign. (Seriously, you have never breathed a sigh of relief quite like the one you will when you see how easy it is to create a Facebook ad or multiple FAST. Like, multiple-winning-ads-in-seconds fast). 

O is for Optimize 

Optimizing your ad budget is a breeze when you know what’s working and what’s not. Download our ebook for a detailed guide! 

R is for Report 

Checking daily Facebook ads reports? Read a more in-depth guide on Facebook ad metrics that you should be paying attention in our FREE ebook! 

Try The Campaign Maker FREE for 30 Days! 

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