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Want the ultimate Facebook advertising strategy? Of course you do! That’s why we created this 17 point guide just for you. 

Whether this is your first time advertising on Facebook, or even if you own your own ad agency, these 17 powerful steps will work for you! 

Pull up a new document, or go old school and get a sheet of paper and a pen. Answer as quickly as you can. Perform all steps as soon as possible. We’re going to move fast, so you can too! 

1. What is your Facebook ad goal? 

What do you want the ad to do? Boost your page views? Convert your audience to sales? Get more leads? Promote brand awareness? 

2. Who is your ideal customer? 

Write down demographics here. Age, gender, location, profession, interests, etc. What life event(s) did they just go through? Are your ideal customers newly engaged, married, divorced, etc.? Facebook can even target new homeowners. 

It also knows what your audience has recently purchased and browsed. Thinking about these things will pay off in spades. You will have much less competition for the best ad placements on Facebook! 

3. What’s a good hook or callout for your audience? 

This is the first line of an ad. Decide which hook would snag your audience’s attention. 

Here’s an example of a callout: “Hey [Floridians, Single Moms, Entrepreneurs, Fitness Nuts]!” 

And here’s a question hook example: “Tired of being in debt?” 

Perhaps a shocking fact like this would grab their attention: “Did you know 1 in 2 people suffer from ______?” 

Sales with a percentage off work well too. 

4. What’s your story? 

This is the line or two after the headline. Keep it brief. Who are you? Why are you helping your audience? Did you just create a new product, service, course, etc.? 

Pro Tip: If you find this section hard to write, your audience will find it hard to read. If it isn’t getting you pumped and excited, it’s not getting your audience pumped and excited. You’re selling here. Not writing an autobiography. 

Do not turn into a windbag. No one really cares about your story alone. They simply want to know why you are helping them

Always, always, always keep your audience in mind. Everything about your brand, products, and ads needs to be centered around solving their problems. 

5. What’s your offer? 

Tell your audience what deal you are offering to them if they take advantage right now. Pitch it. Pitch it really well. Short, to-the-point text works the best. 

Once again, not only are you helping them solve their problems, but you are also giving them a special deal. 

6. Are you going to use an image or a video? 

Pick the one that would suit what you’re selling the best. 

7. Is it the best image or video? 

Is your image powerful, stunning, and high definition? Does it have no or low text? Is your video all of the above and 30 seconds or less? 

8. Put a sticky note on your computer that you need to click (and create) an Instant Experience. 

On Facebook, an Instant Experience will create a full page ad when people click on it, and Instant Experience will instantly immerse your audience on a nurturing landing page with zero lag time. Trust us. You’ll see a huge difference in your Facebook advertising results. 

9. Create and label your audience. 

Let’s turn your ideal customer into an ideal audience. Now, using what you listed for #2, create a new audience. Record all the demographics, interests, life events, etc. Layer as much information as possible so Facebook can target the right people. 

10. Repeat numbers 1-9 again using a different version of everything. 

Trust us. (We’ll show you why). When repeating #9, create another audience that you believe will be ideal. Label this audience something slightly different, such as “your campaign’s name + v2 (version 2).” We’ll use this audience in a minute. 

11. What’s your budget? 

Decide on a lifetime budget or a campaign budget. 

12. Do you want to set a daily budget or to be billed incrementally? 

Facebook allows you to set a daily budget, for which you will be billed at the end of the campaign, with every day having a consistent budget, or it allows you to be billed incrementally. 

Increment billing means when the advertising cost reaches a certain amount, then you will be billed. Say your increment is $100. Every time your advertising costs reach $100, you will be billed. Keep in mind that the increment can be reached several times a month. 

13. Create a split test. 

Here’s where you’ll use your second set of answers for points one through nine. 

Actually, you’ll only be changing ONE variable at a time. For example, during the first split test, test the same ad with two different images. 

14. Decide how long you want your split test to run. 

It only takes a few days to see which ad is performing better. After you see which image is capturing your audience’s attention, take that image and move to the next step. 

15. Review your results. 

After the short split test, review your results for your answer for number one. 

16. Take the winner, move on, and test the next variable. 

Now that you know the image that gets you the most results, create another split test. This time, you’ll be comparing your ad copy (steps three through five). 

17. Repeat numbers 13 through 16 until you have tested all of your variables. 

Test these variables: images, ad copy, audiences, and delivery optimization. 

Repeat this entire process as needed. This Facebook ads strategy will serve you well if used completely and properly. Always remember to manage your ads. Even if you have the perfect ad, it can, after time, stop performing as well. If the ad’s performance does drop, simply repeat this process with fresh ideas, and your ad will be good to go! 

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● Create multiple Facebook ads in seconds. 

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